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Us 14, Wisconsin 11, Portage 6, U.s. 5, New York 4, Cnn 3, Fredericka 3, Pentagon 3, Jonathan Allen 3, California 3, America 3, Minnesota 3, Albuquerque 3, Neutrogena 2, Legos 2, Heather Cabot 2, Dr. Sanjay Gupta 2, Eddie Long 2, Martin Savidge 2, Rahm Emanuel 2,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business.  

    September 26, 2010
    5:00 - 6:00pm EDT  

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>> to find out exactly what the pope knew and did not, father murphy -- what he did or did not know about father murphy, tune into a cnn documentary, what the pope knew" at 8:00 p.m. eastern time. meantime, breaking news we want to tell you about. we're talking about a levee failure taking place in portage, wisconsin. we understand there have been some evacuations that have been taking place. we've been reporting and jacqui has been showing and talking about the flooding what's taking place there and how many of the rivers have already crested. there might be more cresting to come, but meantime, the big concern is about this levee failure in portage, wisconsin. jacqui jeras from the severe weather center now. jacqui, what more do we know about exactly where this took place in portage? >> yeah, this is on the south side. this is near the blackhawk park area. they're asking people to evacuate immediately. they say that the dam here, this is the calladonia levee south of
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highway 33 is failing at this time. so emergency vehicles, police, fire are all trying to get in there. they say they're not going to be able to reach residents if they don't get out now. hopefully most of those people have already done that. here's the area we're talking about. i zoomed in very closely. this is highway 33 right along here. this is the wisconsin river. and my guess is right in this area is right where that dam is. the levee, the calladonia levee. this is really all the information we have at this time. the river did crest, according to the national weather service, earlier this morning. that was just a couple of hours ago. and that's still a lot of pressure from this rushing water. all the gates have been opened trying to get that water downstream. but the flooding situation, as you know, has just been extreme across parts of wisconsin and minnesota as well. we've got a number of warnings which remain in effect. you can see all of those green boxes, anywhere between 4 and 11 inches of rain fell earlier in the week. of course, all that water runs
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off and takes its time before it crests and makes its way downstream. we'll continue to monitor this situation. a very dangerous situation unfolding now as that levee is beginning to fail. fredericka? >> jacqui, thanks so much. going to follow up on that with kathy johnson, i think she's the deputy director at the emergency management of columbia county. so give me an idea of how you're able to get these evacuations under way. mandatory or is it voluntary at this point? >> all evacuations are voluntary. we cannot force anyone to come out if they choose not to. we are just encouraging that people do because of the situation where the access going into this area will not be passable. which means that police, fire, ems will not be able to get into these residents, if need be. >> how many people are we talking in this area? >> i'm not really sure how many
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people there are. >> is it pretty significant? you know, a community or is this very rural? >> the whole area is probably about 150 homes. some of the homes are higher than others. but it all goes in and out through one road. >> and what does emergency management need right now to help out people? >> we need people to listen to the fact that we are asking them to leave because we have residents that are saying, i'm high and dry. don't want to leave, and i don't think they understand the emergency part of it if someone needs to get in to them. so that is where our concern is. at 4:00 today, which is two minutes ago, they were putting a hard closure, which means that the road into the blackhawk park area is being closed. so anyone that is in there right now basically will not be able to come out if they don't come out immediately. >> are you concerned that ultimately boats or perhaps even helicopters would have to be
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used to help out some of the people who are refusing to leave now because they might be in danger later? >> correct. >> all right, kathy johnson with the emergency management of columbia county, thanks so much for your time. appreciate that. >> you're welcome. >> all the best. >> thank you. meantime, another top story of the day. we continue to follow david versus goliath. a biblical battle that pastor eddie long says he identifies with as he fights sexual abuse allegations. in lawsuits filed last week, four men claim long coerced them into sexual relationships while they were in their late teens. bishop long addressed the scandal today during a sermon to his atlanta-area congregation. without specifically mentioning the lawsuits, long insisted that he is under attack and, quote, not the man that's been portrayed on television. you're seeing him in images right there with his wife earlier. well, after the service, he talked to reporters. >> i just want to take this
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moment to address you again, as the advice of counsel, i am not going to address the allegations and the attack that's been levied upon me at this moment because, again, as i stated earlier in the service, you know, i want this to be dealt in the court of justice and not by public opinion. i will say that i am going to fight, fight very vigorously against these charges. and i've been at this church for 23 years. this is the first time i realize that we are as important as we are to get this much attention. and we're going to continue as a church to do the things that we do to touch the world. >> so many people including members of long's church were anxiously awaiting to see what the pastor would say this morning specifically about the allegations. cnn's martin savidge has been covering this story all weekend long and was at the church.
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so overwhelmingly, were they mee pleased at what the past her to say and how he handled this? >> well, it's interesting. we got there at 5:30 in the morning, and there were people in the parking lot waiting for the church to open so they could go inside for a service that would not begin until 8:00 in the morning. so that was quite remarkable. and it showed you the anticipation because this was the first time that the bishop was going to speak publicly. yes, we've heard from his attorneys, from his spokespeople, but this was him facing his family, as he put it. and so as we watched people go in, a great mixture of emotions. you know, some people were playing the music, and they were feeling the spirit very much. others were going in. and they didn't want to talk to the media. i even saw a few people who were in tears as they were just fearful of what they might hear. but once it began, once it was quite clear that the bishop was defiant in his stance, well, as we talked to people when they came out, most of them were highly supportive of the bishop. only a few did we find skeptical. take a listen.
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>> i think he made his membership feel comfortable, but by saying that that just is not who he is, that's not who he is. it's not who any of us believe he is. but he's not perfect. he's not perfect. none of us are. >> he really didn't say anything. it seemed like he avoided the subject. he just said what he wanted to say. i don't think he said anything. >> okay. >> i know no more now than i did when i came here. >> and that's one aspect here is that there were some parishioners who wanted to hear him say, "i am innocent" and wanted to hear him defiantly say, "this did not happen." >> but instead his language was, "i will fight this." >> right. and his language was, of course, quoting scripture and in some ways people thought that perhaps he was speaking more to the fact that he might be deposed and asked legal questions or asked on the stand later about what he said. and therefore he didn't speak -- in other words, he left himself
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some wiggle room. but again, we could be parsing too much of this. one thing i should point out is that we were told we were going to have a news conference afterwards. instead, bishop long came out. his attorney said, there will be no questions. which was a surprise. we had been brought in believing we would be allowed to ask questions. the bishop left immediately after making his at the same time time. >> the attorneys didn't ask questions? >> no, no one did. sfwhoo what's next now for the pastor as it pertains to new birth? will he carry on as scheduled, or is there any reason to believe that perhaps he's spoken, an associate, you know, pastor may speak at the church from here on out for a while, that he's going to be quiet and hidden away? >> there was a lot of people, manufacture us in the media and those of us who follow religion, had thought perhaps he would step down temporarily.
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and that might have been the announcement that he was going to make at today's service. but we knew the moment he said, i have been here and i will be here next week, that that certainly wasn't going to happen. so he is going to continue to be very much in the public. he's going to continue his leadership role. i think what we wonder is what evidence may come next. could there be further young men who come forward with stories similar to the ones that have already been told. so far there could be more suits. it remains to be seen what happens next. or do we just wait until all of this gets into a courtroom? one thing we do know is that the gauntlet's been thrown down. and bishop eddie long says that he is going to fight. >> martin savidge, thanks so much for reporting on this all weekend long. i know we'll be hearing more from you throughout the week. thanks so much. also, an israeli moratorium on building settlements in the west bank officially runs out in less than an hour. what this means for peace talks. i didn't miss a premium payment for 10 years.
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i know people are wondering-- now that the well is capped, is bp gonna meet its commitments? i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. iaiaiaiabetes. and i'm worried if i lose my job, i won't be able to afford insurance. not anymore. america's healthcare reforms change lives for the better. to see how it can help you, visit us at americasfairhealthcare.org an israeli moratorium on building settlements in the west bank officially runs out in about 45 minutes. it's a major sticking point in peace talks between the israelis and palestinians. but as our paula newton reports
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from the west bank, some settlers aren't waiting for the official end. >> reporter: settlers this sunday are putting on a show for the media and for the world. it's a show of victory that as far as they're concerned, the freeze is over. and it is business as usual when it am comes to building settlems in the west bank. settlers had a groundbreaking ceremony, a symbolic gesture, pouring concrete for the cameras but also with a message that as soon as monday, that is what they intend to be doing across the west bank for the next days, weeks, months and years. but there is a worry among many settlers that even though the freeze is not been extended officially, they may see a silent extension. and they may find it more difficult to have their building permits approved by the powers that be. >> we would have to fight the bureaucracy. peld have to fight the defense minister, ehud barak.
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all the forces we have to fight for the existence of the jewish people >> reporter: a countdown on sunday. more than 1,000 settlers in the settlement came to what they see it a new building season followed by 2,000 balloons they say released to symbolize 2 thousand new buildings ready to go here. there's 13 thousand buildings which already have been approved and they could start building on those on monday. now, there was a peace rally in jerusalem just outside the prime minister's residence. and it's turned pretty hairy and pretty frustrated at one point. one of the leaders of peace now making a speech, a right-wing member of the public obviously did not appreciate what he was saying, and it did get pretty heated. the fact is the u.n., the u.s., the european union and the palestinians have all asked israel to extend this settlement freeze. as we know, there has been no official announcement. we weren't expecting an official announcement, but peace now is
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with those countries saying the settlements must stop. >> unfortunately, along the years, especially in the last decades, the number of settlers has doubled. and we see today that there are over 300,000 settlers living around the west bank. >> reporter: settlers here are celebrating what they say as a green light to keep building settlements across the west bank. it's really not certain when it comes to the israeli government whether or not they will have those permits approved. paula hancocks, cnn, in the settlement in the west bank. palestinian leader mahmoud abbas says peace talks will be a, quote, waste of time, unquote, if settlement construction resumes. there was talk of a possible compromise earlier in the week. so joining me now is cnn senior state department producer elise labot in our new york bureau. elise, what are you hearing right now as to what really is happening? >> well, fredericka, there are a lot of intense negotiations going on up till the very last
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minute. officials from all sides telling us that secretary of state clinton, peace envoy george mitchell and israeli and palestinian negotiating teams really trying to come up with a formula that will allow the israelis to appear not to have caved but to also keep palestinian president mahmoud abbas at those talks. now, there's a tremendous amount of frustration on the point of the u.s., fredericka, because they've really put a lot of political capital into getting these peace talks on, want to see them continue or kind of telling the parties, don't let this opportunity pass you by. but as the clock ticks down, we're waiting to see what israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is going to do. >> so roughly 44 minutes ago. what happens tomorrow if no deal? >> well, we're really not expecting any grand announcements tonight, as paula has said. anything that the israelis are going to come up seem to be kind of ambiguous and vague and could be interpreted in many different ways. so what u.s. officials expect is
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there's going to be, in no extension of the deadline, the moratorium will expire, but then there will be some kind of caveats about restraint, about reviewing settlement policy, as paula had said, maybe those permits would take a little bit longer, and that would buy the parties a few more months to get those peace talks going. so it looks as if there's not going to be any precipitous announcements on the part of the israelis or the palestinians. of course, we can't deny they're going to be some kind of settlers or politicians that will be making some noise, trying to interrupt that process. but we think that what's going to happen is the deadline is going to expire. they're going to keep on talking for the next few days. we understand that the arab states will be meeting next week. they're not going to be making any announcements about walking out of the talks right away. they're going to meet next week perhaps in cairo to discuss what the arabs should do. possibly allow palestinian president abbas to walk out of those talks. but it's really unclear what he'll do without some kind of serious gesture from the israelis. >> state department producer elise labott, thanks so much,
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joining us from new york. appreciate it. all right. what would cause the pentagon to torch nearly 10,000 books? what an army intelligence officer's new memoir reveals about the war in afghanistan right after this.
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so the new college year has started. and millions of freshmen are facing life on their own for the very first time. and some still call home for advice, but these days many kids just look things up on the internet. so what are they looking for? what kinds of instructions? how-tos? heather cabot is yahoo!'s web life editor. she's joining us right now from new york. good to see you. >> thank you. good to see you, too.
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>> this made me start thinking, what were some of the things i wanted to know that first year? i think it was grocery shopping. i didn't know what to get at the store. you've done a study to find out what they're searching for online to find out what are the top how-tos. and what did you find that topped the list? >> so what we did at yahoo! is we looked at the top how-to queries among 18 to 22-year-olds. and the top one, how to do laundry. so i'm sure for you, that was probably a big question. i know it was for me. i'm sure there are a lot of college freshmen walking around now with pink socks and underwear because they didn't know to separate. >> that was me, too. >> yeah. but the thing is, and what really is a sign of the times, in the old days you might call mom up. she'd officially tell you you've made this mistake. now you don't have to do that a anymore. now you can go online. laundry is the big one right now. also how to cope with stress. research for how to cope with stress, up 189% just this week. we're also seeing searches for
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how to deal with long-distance relationships. people looking for tips on that. those are up 40%. >> that's a big number. >> so a lot of people, you know, high school sweethearts trying to figure out how to navigate the long-distance relationship. >> yeah, after the first year they realize, forget it. why do that? and then they want to know about their textbooks. they kind of need some help navigating how to, what, how to find the best deal on these textbooks or what they really need out of them? >> i am so sorry, but i completely lost you. but what i can tell you is that people are very interested in what constitutes plagiarism. we've seen a lot of searches for that as well as how to cite a textbook and how to cite a website. and literally, this is what kids are typing into search engines. kids between the ages of 18 to 22 on yahoo!. >> okay. and how to cite a website was another, how to cite a textbook. and then they want to know how to cook. once they've realized that
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they're on their own, mom's not there to cook for them anymore, they want to know how to make spaghetti. are you able to hear me on that one? >> i am so sorry, fredericka. i think our dropped out. so i cannot hear your question. i can tell you that we also saw a lot of cooking questions which you referenced in the beginning. suggestions for how to cook spaghetti are up 600% in the last month. also a big one, how to hard boil an egg. and we took a look at yahoo! to see how many results actually come up when you type that in. if you want to find out how to hard boil an egg, you can find more than 9 million results on yahoo!. a lot of them were videos, actually, and that's a trend today, too, is it's very big right now on the internet for people to upload how-to videos. obviously, there are professional cooking sites and some terrific resources, but also, if you look on youtube, there are all kinds of how-tos that are there. i think college students are very savvy and know they can turn to the been and get all
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kinds of advice. >> fantastic, heather cabot with yahoo!'s -- she's the web life editor of yahoo!. thanks for hanging in there. we lost our audio but got us through all those how-tos. inch a hot-button issue in the midterms. we'll take a closer look next. ♪ everything you need to stretch out on long trips. residence inn. ♪
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we're keeping a close watch on portage, wisconsin, because we understand that there has been a levee that's been compromised there after all that flooding that's taken place. and officials are telling people who live in the blackhawk park area, that it's time to leave. voluntary evacuations are under way. all that rain has certainly caused a lot of problems. jacqui jeras has been telling us a lot about what's been taking place in that area. many rivers have crested. and in wisconsin and in
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minnesota. and possibly there might be activity tomorrow as well. today's minnesota governor has even been touring some of the damaged areas,ite, jacqui? >> yeah, it's really bad. even though some of these rivers have crested, fredericka, keep in mind that they're still in flood. this is going to be a problem for a couple days. these rivers are dumping into the mississippi river which then will rise up and we'll see some flooding there maybe in lacrosse and even the winona area later in the week. now rkt the big concern at this hour is in columbia county. and this is the portage area that we're talking about. and to put it in perspective for you, we'll put this google earth, this is in central parts of wisconsin. and this is right along the wisconsin river. and what's happened is that that river has crested early this morning at the second highest crest on record. and this is a very old levee system. what we're learning now from the wisconsin dnr is that this is a 14-mile-long levee system. and it's basically made out of sand. so it's kind of like a dike. it's not a bridge or anything like that.
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and there have been efforts to try and patch the levee. and unfortunately, they've been unsuccessful. about 300 residences are being threatened in this area. they're not sure how many of those people remain. this levee is in the process of being compromised. and so if this completely fails, the road is going to be washed without. and then law enforcement officials won't be able to get in to rescue any people. this is hydrological map here that shows you the river gauges here at portage. and there you can see that big crest earlier this morning. so it's going to slowly start to fall off the next couple of days. and this was literally, what, a tenth of a foot shy of that record. so just a tremendous amount of power from this water and a tremendous amount of pressure on a very old levee system. on the wisconsin dnr website, it says basically the only reason this levee hasn't been compromised in the past is because it hasn't had this much pressure. it hasn't seen a major flood like this. so dangerous moments and a scary
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situation unfolding now in central wisconsin. >> yeah, it's come in a very big way. thank you, jacqui. increased scrutiny for the pentagon after about 10,000 copies of an army intelligence officer's memoir were burped. defense department officials say the book threatened national security. it's called, the book is, "operation dark heart." and last hour i spoke with the author, lieutenant colonel, anthony shaffer, about what it was like having to re-edit the book for the second printing. >> i sat through the process of going through the redactions. the army directed me after -- the department of defense, primarily defense intelligence agency had trouble with the manuscripts. the whole process was where two different starns were used, the standard i used and the standard the d.o.d. applied were vastly different. that's why i think you see the drama which unfolded and the
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interest of d.o.d. to come in and change things the way they did. and, you know, i can't argue against d.o.d. they have a perring on tifr to do this. however, i've said several times that the way they looked at it wasn't appropriate by the fact that they didn't bother to check with the sourcing of my research assistant and everything that she did to make sure that everything was found in the open public sector in some form, or the individuals who had worked with me in the army to actually go through item by item. i mean, they had tons of questions i had to answer relating to sourcing to make sure. >> were you worried while compiling the facts, while recalling your memories of your missions, while you were crafting this book, were you worried at all about national security foremost? >> absolutely. >> or were you thinking about i want to tell my story regard littregardless of how it might affect national security. >> first, it related to
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frequencies, effect nolg or anything that could give the enemy an advantage, that was completely off limits. nothing was ever discussed. secondly, specific techniques which have never been exposed publicly in any regard were completely left off the table. there's a number of things which we did i can't get into. >> so we did reach out to the defense department about why the pentagon your honor abouted 10,000 copies of this book. no one was available for comment today. but earlier we got the following statement from lieutenant general ronald burgess with the defense intelligence agency, saying this. quote, the dia's investigation identified significant classified information. the release of which i have determined could reasonably be expected to cause serious damage to national security. it goes on to say, quote, the manuscript contains secret activities of the u.s. special operations command, cia and national security agency. end quote. on to politics now. and a rare situation in california. "the san francisco chronicle"
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newspaper says it will not endorse anyone in the hotly contested california senate race. former hewlett-packard ceo carly fiorina is battling incumbent democrat barbara boxer in what has sometimes become a rather nasty race. the paper says californians are left with a deeply unsatisfying choice. and president barack obama is hitting the road again this week to push his economic message. ahead are stops in backyards in des moines as well as albuquerque. joining me right now from washington is jonathan allen, political reporter for politico.com. good to see you. >> good evening. >> jonathan, let's talk about the president's schedule and why he is campaigning for the most part for his policy. >> well, i think there's a deep desire not only among democrats but among americans, in general, to hear a little bit more from the president about what he's doing to rescue the economy. you know, we've heard him say
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that he was going to focus like a laser on the economy. but since then there's been a lot of talk about his health care agenda. there's been a lot of talk about middle east peace. and i think, you know, in the run-up to the election, i think you're going to hear him talk a lot more specifically about the economy and the benefits of the health care package and how those relate to the economy for individuals. we've seen some of those benefits, the six-month period benefits starting to come into effect now. so i think there's a feeling that there's been an inability of the president to communicate effectively on what he's done for the american people and what would have happened had he not stepped in. and that's very important, obviously, to his party in the upcoming midterm election. >> and when on tuesday he's in albuquerque, he's kind of returning to a format he's been very comfortable. and we saw him doing it when he was campaigning for presidency. these town hall meetings. in this case in albuquerque, he'll be meeting face to face with a number of families talking about the economy. hearing from them directly, what they need, what they want
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changed. and he's going to give kind of back-and-forth dialogue on what is really going to be feasible or possible? >> well, it's really a good opportunity for the president to appear to be addressing the concerns of the people in the audience. of course, the white house is able to control those audiences, who comes in, who asks questions. i think not only president obama but recent candidates decided it's a good idea to show them competent on the issues, to be able to respond to specific questions. so it is a good format, generally speaking. it's not like these town hall members of congress where they get asked hostile questions or run into people who simply have come to shout them down. >> on wednesday he'll be heading to des moines. he'll be doing something similar, talking to families there. but along the way when he stops in madison, wisconsin, he will be talking politics. he'll be attending a dnc rally. we are talking about midterm elections. what is the greatest worry for the president in terms of what message he needs to hit home to try and save democrats who are
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up for office? >> i think what you're hearing more and more from democrats right now and bill clinton certainly gave this advice recently is that they have to make the argument that they deserve a couple more years to let their program move forward for the american people, that things would have been a lot worse. you're going to hear the president hit that. as far as the worst fear goes for them, obviously the president's agenda will run into a roadblock if republicans take control of the house. and it will be severely hampered even if there are major gains for republicans. you see a diminished democratic majority in the house and also in the senate. this is really high-stakes time for the president's agenda and for his supporters if they want to see thatjonathan, i wonder i agenda is in trouble or in peril as we're hearing rumors about key members of his cabinet, his support base who may be thinking about leaving, who have left most recently. i'm talking about rahm emanuel. he's considering the chicago mayoral run. then there's also word that david axelrod may also be
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thinking about departing the white house. what would this do to the president's agenda? or does this mean pressing a real restart button for him? >> it is like pressing the restart button. it shouldn't be surprising to see emanuel leave even if he wasn't interested in running for mayor of chicago. the career expectancy of a white house chief of staff is about that of a rodeo clown or nfl running back. these guys don't stick around long. >> maybe he wouldn't mind the analogy with a running back, but i don't know, rodeo clown. >> everybody's out for you. you get speared pretty quickly in that job. >> okay. >> but there should probably be other departures after the election, too, maybe cabinet secretaries to look for on the horizon. >> all right, jonathan allen, although i do love a rodeo clown when i go to the rodeo, but i don't know what david axelrod and rahm emanuel would think about that. >> it's not their first rodeos. >> okay, very good. jonathan allen, thanks so much.
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good to see you. >> take care. several key provisions of the health care reform law which took effect this past week. will preventative care like mammograms and immunizations now must be covered. children can stay on their parents' policies until the age of 26. and lifetime coverage limits are gone. but some of these changes may only be temporary if republicans have their way. many say repealing the new health care law will be first item on the agenda if the gop gains a congressional majority after the midterm elections. so i talked about that with health care expert andrew rubin. >> someone who works in the health care industry and understands it pretty well. health care reform does not work if you start picking apart pieces of this. and what republicans are talking about doing is they're latching on to public opinion polls which say a good chunk of americans don't support health care reform. but what they want to do is they want to, quote, fix it and take
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provisions out of the bill that was turned into law. and quite frankly, it just won't work because health care is so interconnected. and it's so complicated, as we all know. so to start picking up our pieces of it, the whole thing will collapse. i don't know what's going to happen. i got to tell you, if they do start picking apart pieces of this and they actually succeed in the political circles, then health care reform basically would have to start all over because it won't work. >> health experts, for more information on the health care law and republicans efforts to repeal it potentially, go to cnn.com. josh is coming up with a special edition of "viral videos." what do you have going for us? >> liven things up for a few minutes. some viral videos take months to create like this. ♪ all that work. might be rewarded in a whole new way. this video by a swedish band that's on a short list in a competition by youtube and the guggenheim, their search for the
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most creative videos in the world. plus, some videos on the short list that you have seen that made it. i'm going to show you them right after this. it's work through the grime and the muck, month. tow and pull without getting stuck month. sweat every day to make an honest buck...month. and if you're gonna try and do this in anything other than a chevy... well, good luck...month. great deals on the complete family of chevy trucks all backed for a hundred thousand miles. it's truck month. now buy this 2011 all-star edition silverado and combine the option package discount with other offers for a total value of five thousand dollars. see your local chevrolet dealer.
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step away from the internet. schedule no meetings. hold all your phone calls. for the next hour, there will be no agenda. marie callender's invites you back to lunch, with a new line of fresh recipes. like chicken teriyaki with crisp water chestnuts. it steams to perfection in minutes, giving the fresh flavors and textures of a homemade meal. marie's new steamed meals. it's time to savor. marie's new steamed meals. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund.
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i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right.
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our top stories right now, u.s. negotiators are scrambling to keep middle east peace talks from collapsing this weekend as a ban on jewish settlement building is set to expire. palestinian leaders say if construction resumes, that's enough of a reason to walk away from the table. but so far israel has refused to extend the ban on building in the west bank. and hyundai is planning to recall thousands of brand-new
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sedans because of potential steering problems. we're talking about nearly 140,000 sonatas, all of them 2011 models built in alabama. they say it's possible joints in the steering column were not put together correctly. and that could cause a complete loss of steering. they will officially start the recall in october. and lindsay lohan is voluntarily checking herself into a substance abuse reh w days. that'shat a source close to the actress told cnn today. her decision comes two days after a judge ordered her to jail without bail because she failed a drug test. she was later released on $300,000 bond. ooh, this is a special edition of "viral videos" today, josh with us now. >> i told you a little bit about it yesterday. this is wild. youtube and the guggenheim have gotten together, let's show this
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video, and they have this basically search for the world's most creative and innovative videos out there. and they had more than 23,000 submissions for this. people out there who have made these videos, groups submitted all these. they've had people actually go through all of them. and after this long search, they have chosen 125 as the short list right now. what they're going to be doing, you can look at these all online right now. they're ultimately going to be putting up 20 and announcing the 20 most creative, most innovative videos in october. and you can see these videos at the guggenheim kiosks around the world. it will be a lot of prestige that goes along with it. what we've done yesterday and today -- >> the guggenheim name behind it. >> we talked about this, a lot of videos are modern art. expression. people put a lot of work into these. that's why we're going to start
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with an example of one that took eight months to create. eight months from a swedish band. i can't pronounce the name of it. no one can. it's going to be on your screen, though. there you go. right after youtube.com, that's it. >> will it stay there for eight months? >> look at all those legos. so we can practice? look at all those legos. it took about 1500 hours to make the lego animations. that's just part of the video. then they go into other celebrations of kid games and retro stuff but really amazing work. >> it is amazing. >> yeah. >> now it looks like a birthday cake. >> it does. i think that's what they're going for. in a similar vein, the u.s. group okay, go. they keep doing funky videos. we've seen them before. this is one that's also on the short list. take a look. this is "this too shall pass." >> i think i remember this one. >> you remember this one. >> yeah, i do. >> this made the short list for
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among the most innovative ever. actually put it into second place. just to remind you how huge it is, what happens, stuff falls, everything explodes. ultimately it was all one shot. >> that's the thing. i was going to say, was this one take? >> one shot. >> it was one shot. i think it was maybe the second take. all the time to set this up. >> oh, my gosh. >> modern art on you tube. managed all over the world. here's one from brancos bardo, a film student in the university of arts in bucharest. it was a project that he did for his degree. he set up these shots. he's basically lying there, but he tells a story in all these pixels, more than 5,400 photographs were shot using a mix of stop-animation techniques. when you watch it, i'm looking at it. he's got a bike. >> that's very cool. i was having a hard time figuring out what i was seeing before, the imagery. this i get.
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>> see? it's cool. and just the time they spend on this. now, this is a whole different one. watch this. it also made the short list. this is called the mother of all funk. professionally known as kut michltman. he's from israel. he created this online video project through you, and "time" named it one of the 50 best inventions. he takes all this footage out there of amateur musicians, and he turns it into what "time" calls this incredibly funky music sound. so we're just seeing random -- >> a mix of everybody. >> bring it in full for a second so we can hear it. ♪ unrelated music. she's, like, mm-hmm. >> it's funky. no, no. it's funky. i'm acknowledging the funk. >> it's got a little funk to it. when you're in the mood. all right. now, here's another one that's a whole different kind of funky. >> yeah. >> there's this new phenom going
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on. and the short list has pretty much the pioneer of this, all right? let's go to it. known as the pioneer of what's called tilt shift time lapse technique. this is actual video of people in australia, in sydney. but there's this photographer who basically figured out that if he used a combination of tim lapse and stop motion, it looks like miniature. >> yeah, it does. i'm like, these are really people? >> this is keith lotite who does impressive work. we're hearing clem intine by "washington." >> how long did it take to do? >> and, in a way, this is doubling as your relaxation video. feeling it? >> whatever there's water, that usually makes me relax. yes. >> let's get the water. >> i love the coast. anybody's coast. >> did the guy just fall in the water? >> no, he actually -- i saw that at first, too. people jump in and dive, they
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get in the water. because it's stop motion sometimes, you only see bits. >> making like a little bob. there he is, he's swimming now. whew! >> he's okay. he was saved. >> throw him a life raft. okay. so you all can check out all 125. i've posted the links on facebook and twitter. that's the place to send me your favorite. virus including relaxation videos. we'll be back on saturday. >> we can't wait. always good stuff. hey, going back, did you always like your school lunches? >> yeah, did i always? >> did you ever like them all in it was kind of fun, but did you remember the food? >> i think it was pretty gross a lot of the time, but i was so young, i didn't care. i would eat the pizza, the burgers. did you? >> i have fond memories with the food. >> associated with it. >> inning i loved the tater tots and pizza at the time but now that i know -- >> the chocolate milk, every day, chocolate milk.
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>> i wasn't into chocolate milk. just plain old milk. we're going to talk about school links. it's eatocracy week and there are some inventive ways folks are trying to get kids to like good, healthy stuff food. i went to my stylistogain, and she said hair was growing back... i was like, yes, this works... [ male announcer ] only rogaine is proven to regrow hair in 85% of guys. puhh puhh puhh putt and that's it. [ male announcer ] stop losing. start gaining. i but i justve my 5 employcan't afford it.ance, and that's it. i have diabetes. i didn't miss a premium payment for 10 years. and i'm worried if i lose my job, i won't be able to afford insurance. when i graduated from college, i lost my health insurance. the minute i got sick, i lost my insurance. not anymore. not anymore. not anymore. america's healthcare reforms change lives for the better. to find out how it can help you, visit us at americasfairhealthcare.org it's not just fair, it's the law.
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my favorite topic, let's talk food, the kind that's good for you and tastes good. school lunches are getting an overhaul from a celebrity chef on a mission. dr. sanjay gupta has more on this edition of "eatocracy." >> reporter: chef anne cooper is on a mission, to revolutionize the national school lunch program that feeds more than 330 million children a day. this celebrity chef, whose turned into a renegade lunch
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lady, has already brought her school lunch revolution from cafeterias in harlem, new york, to berkeley, california, and boulder, colorado. and she tells us she isn't stopping there. >> it's really, i mean, not easy to change, but it's really changeable. you can change those chicken nuggets to roast chicken, the tater tots to roast potatoes, you can add salad bars. >> reporter: parents who came to hear her speak experience school lunch chef anne style. 1 in 3 children born in the united states will develop diabetes, 1 in 3, and 30% of them are overweight. the cost to treat diabetes, $174 billion every year. >> we're going to pay now or we're going to pay later. we're going to pay now for healthy food and healthy kids or pay later with an obesity and diabetes crisis. >> reporter: she's launched the lunch box.org with 80 recipes to spread the healthy lunch revolution to schools across the
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country. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn reporting. >> we'll be looking at food's lasting imprincipals. catch our series, "eatocracy: mind, body and wallet." don lemon is up next with more in the "newsroom." there he is waving. he's ready to roll. one of his top stories will be about bishop eddie long and that scandal and his taking the pulpit today. ♪ now the healing power of touch just got more powerful. introducing precise from the makers of tylenol. precise pain relieving heat patch activates sensory receptors. it helps block pain signals for deep penetrating relief you can feel precisely where you need it most. precise. only from the makers of tylenol. guarantee me the best deal on my refinance loan, or pay me $1,000?
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sweat every day to make an honest buck...month. and if you're gonna try and do this in anything other than a chevy... well, good luck...month. great deals on the complete family of chevy trucks all backed for a hundred thousand miles. it's truck month. now buy this 2011 all-star edition silverado and combine the option package discount with other offers for a total value of five thousand dollars. see your local chevrolet dealer.